Tag Archives: trends

Dear Lendink

 

I don’t claim to know all the ins and outs of how this book business works, but I do know that I am offended on your behalf. Recently, your site was shut down because a group of authors decided you were a pirate. I visited your site. I read your FAQ page. I did some research and as far as I could discover you were doing exactly what you said you were doing.

I did NOT see any signs of a wooden leg, a hook where your hand should be, or a skull and crossbones flag hanging anywhere on your site. Nor did I see an eye patch, though you might have looked quite dashing in an eye patch.

I would like to take a moment to say thank you. Perhaps this is too late, perhaps not. I sincerely appreciate what you were trying to do buy leading readers by the virtual hand to the actual buy pages of the books I write and publish. I am constantly looking for new ways to market our books that do not require more time than I have to give. You did that, willingly, and legally, and you were cast out for your efforts.

::hangs head in shame:: I am sorry that not everyone felt the need to give you the benefit of the doubt and to take the time to figure out that you were acting on behalves and in fact doing us a FAVOR.

I would like to let you know that should you get your site back up and running, you have my permission to LEGALLY promote my books on your site. This goes for anyone who wants to LEGALLY introduce readers to the books of Echelon Press. Don’t steal from me, don’t distribute or lend our books without ensuring that the authors and I are being full compensated within our legal rights. But by all means, if you want to post covers and links to where readers can BUY our books LEGALLY, you have my blessing and my supports.

I am certain I am not the only one angered at your mistreatment. You can find another supporter at the blog of April L. Hamilton. http://aprillhamilton.blogspot.com/2012/08/congratulations-you-killed-lendink-and.html

Respectfully,

Karen L. Syed

 

 

 

 

What was Satan Thinking?

 

First, let’s be clear on what I mean when I say POD books. This term has become so misused and misunderstood that it has actually resulted in lost sales for many. This doesn’t need to be the case.

POD stands for PRINT ON DEMAND. You’ll notice the word PRINT. Not publish or promote, PRINT!

POD is the process used by PRINTERS to eliminate the need for excessive runs of print copies. The printer simply waits until there is an order and then prints the specific number of copies ordered, removing the immediate potential for wasted paper.

I’m not sure why POD books have received such a negative reputation, but most booksellers and librarians, and now due to the overwhelming number of authors arguing about it in public forums, readers equate POD with lower quality books. This simply isn’t the case.

For over a decade, a multitude of publishers, both big and small, have been using the POD method for fulfilling orders.

The quality of the written word is determined well before the actual book ever goes to print, thereby eliminating the misconception that POD books are “bad.” It needs to be understood by all that POD, the method of printing does not account for the number of poorly written and edited books being sold in the market.

The biggest problem with the misunderstanding of POD is the ability for companies and authors to market and promote the books. However, with the proper education within the retail (and library) industries, bookseller and acquisition librarians could not only increase their potential sales and titles available, but could increase the variety of stories available to their readers.

Readers crave originality. They are tired of reading the same recycled stories by the same authors. Yet, they are deprived of any freshness in their choices, because the larger and more traditional publishers are reluctant to take any financial risk on the newer and more exciting stories written by unknown or new authors.

I would encourage everyone in the book industry to educate themselves and to recognize the value of POD books and to acknowledge the potential for increased sales. Give new authors a chance to prove that they have writing skill and the ability to tell a good story, no matter how many copies of their book is printed at one time.

Furthermore, consider the environmental impact of POD books. A traditional publisher may print 5000 copies of a paperback novel by a new author, and only sell 1500 of them. This means that the remaining 3500 unsold copies will be put into waste. Had the publisher used the POD process to print those books, they would have simply printed the 1500 copies as the orders came in and eliminated the waste. If you did this for 10,000 books in one year, imagine how much paper would be saved and thus less trees.

Bottom line, POD is not the work of Satan. It is simply a process used to print books in smaller quantities. Sorry, Dude, you don’t get credit for this one.

My final point refers to the availability and returnability of books produced using the POD process. The status of returns is not determined across the industry, it is determined by the specific publisher or author. This means that it is an unfair assumption for a bookstore not to carry a POD book, without first determining its returnability status.

We all have choices, but when we make a choice, that doesn’t give us the right to complain when that choice cause a problem.

I hope that after reading this post, more people who speak ill of the POD process will reconsider their “choices” and give authors a fair chance to sell books and entertain readers.

Will you?

Originally published at ©Life as a Publisher by Karen L. Syed
This can be reproduced in it’s entirety with no additions or corrections.

 

The True Beauty of Me and Ashley Judd

Recently, acclaimed actress, author, and all around cool human being, Ashley Judd responded to accusations about her physical condition. Her op-ed piece (you can read it here) has sparked a bit of outrage, but more than anything it may well have started a revolution. IF you haven’t already done so, you will want to read The Conversation. With everything going on in politics these days regarding women and our bodies, the last thing we need is to worry about what others think when we look a little different.

I will admit that I was furious when I read her piece. What right does anyone have to make public speculation about Ashley Judd or anyone? These people spouting lies and starting rumors call themselves journalists, but let’s be real. They are people who have a knack for spinning the ordinary into something outrageous, hurtful, and generally untrue.

The op-ed piece got me to thinking about my role in all this as an author and a publisher. Do I aggravate the situation by writing/publishing books with perfectly formed and wonderfully beautiful characters? Well, I may publish some, but I certainly don’t write them. I make a point to develop each of my characters as real people. You know the type, people with bad hair days, zits, a little bit of extra junk in their trunks, that kind of thing.

Books, especially fiction, have a tendency to paint pictures of things that are way better than real life. That is awesome, fiction is meant to be an adventure, an escape, if you will. But I think it is time we start looking at the entertainment and media venues with a little more responsibility. We cannot blame anyone’s actions on what they read, watch or listen to, but we can, and should recognize that those things do have a significant influence on the decisions we make.

When I opened my mail program this morning, I found my usual lists of Blogs that I subscribe to and read fairly regularly. At the top of the list was the Red, White, and Grew Blog with Pamela Price (who has an awesome Pinterest site.) Pamela has taken the next step in making her voice heard with regard to this issue. Check out her Blog to see what she has to say.

Now, that you’ve read my Blog, Ashley’s Blog, and Pamela’s Blog, I’d love to know how you feel, and what you might have to say about it on YOUR Blog. Now is your chance to be heard. Post your thoughts and comments on your Blog and then pop back over here and leave us a link so we can all read it. And this isn’t just about the women. How far can we spread this? It really does matter.